Evaluation of Solid Free-Form Fabrication-Based Scaffolds Seeded with Osteoblasts and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells for Use In Vivo Osteogenesis

Title
Evaluation of Solid Free-Form Fabrication-Based Scaffolds Seeded with Osteoblasts and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells for Use In Vivo Osteogenesis
Authors
김종영Jin Guang-zhen박인수김정남천소영박의균김신윤James Yoo김상헌이종원조동우
Keywords
scaffold; osteoblast; osteogenesis; SFF fabrication
Issue Date
2010-07
Publisher
Tissue engineering. Part A.
Citation
VOL 16, NO 7, 2229-2236
Abstract
We investigated the feasibility of using solid free-form fabrication (SFF)-based scaffolds seeded with osteoblasts, derived from human adipose-derived stem cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to enhance osteogenesis. To accomplish this goal, SFF-based polycaprolactone/poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid/tricalcium phosphate scaffolds were fabricated using a multihead deposition system, which is one of SFF techniques. The blended polycaprolactone/poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid/TCP scaffolds were seeded with human osteoblasts and HUVECs and implanted into calvaria defects in rats. At 8 and 12 weeks after implantation, microcomputed tomography, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological assays (hematoxylin and eosin staining and Alizarin red staining) were conducted to determine the effects of SFF-based scaffolds on osteogenic potential. In vivo experiments indicated that the osteoblast-only and osteoblast-HUVEC group produced bone formation. Additionally, scaffolds in the osteoblast-HUVEC group had the largest area of new bone tissue. Therefore, we demonstrated through microcomputed tomography and histological assays that scaffolds seeded with both human osteoblasts and HUVECs were superior to other groups for effective bone formation.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/38980
ISSN
1937-3341
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KIST Publication > Article
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