State-of-the-Art Technologies: Brain-Machine Interface in Neurorehabilitation

Title
State-of-the-Art Technologies: Brain-Machine Interface in Neurorehabilitation
Authors
서준교
Issue Date
2010-09
Publisher
서울의대 재활의학교실 연수강좌
Abstract
In May of 2001, Jesse Sullivan, a fifty-five-year-old power-company electrician, accidentally touched a live power line carrying 7200 volts of electricity and had to have both arms immediately amputated at the shoulder. Seven weeks later in November of 2001, Sullivan volunteered to be a guinea pig to test a new experimental myoelectric arm which had been developed by a joint team of physicians and biomedical engineers from Northwestern University and the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. During the operative procedure, a surgeon on the team decided to reroute the ulnar, radial, median, and musculocutaneous nerves from Sullivan’s left-shoulder stump to his pectoral muscle, which was of no use to Sullivan in its original form. With the brain-muscle connection re-established at the pectoral muscle, the myoelectric signals were detected from Sullivan’s chest skin whenever he intended to move his nonexisting wrist and hand. Engineers on the team developed a prosthetic arm which could be controlled by the myoelectric signal acquired from Sullivan’s chest [1]. The result was that Sullivan became the world’s first “bionic” man with an ability to move his prosthetic arm using nothing other than his own intuition (Figure 1).
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/39088
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KIST Publication > Conference Paper
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