Engineered protein nanoparticles for in vivo tumor detection

Title
Engineered protein nanoparticles for in vivo tumor detection
Authors
안금영고호경이보람이은정이종환변영로권익찬김광명이지원
Keywords
Protein nanoparticles; Surface engineering; Tumor detection; Optical imaging
Issue Date
2014-08
Publisher
Biomaterials
Citation
VOL 35, NO 24, 6422-6429
Abstract
Two different protein nanoparticles that are totally different in shape and surface structure, i.e. Escherichia coli DNA-binding protein (eDPS) (spherical, 10 nm) and Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (tPTS) (cylindrical, 12 × 15 nm) were engineered for in vivo optical tumor detection: arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide (CDCRGDCFC) was genetically inserted to the surface of each protein nanoparticle, and also near-infrared fluorescence dye was chemically linked to the surface lysine residues. The specific affinity of RGD for integrin (αvβ3) facilitated the uptake of RGD-presenting protein nanoparticles by integrin-expressing tumor cells, and also the protein nanoparticles neither adversely affected cell viability nor induced cell damage. After intravenously injected to tumor-bearing mice, all the protein nanoparticles successfully reached tumor with negligible renal clearance, and then the surface RGD peptides caused more prolonged retention of protein nanoparticles in tumor and accordingly higher fluorescence intensity of tumor image. In particular, the fluorescence of tumor image was more intensive with tPTS than eDPS, which is due presumably to longer in vivo half-life and circulation of tPTS that originates from thermophilic and acidophilic bacterium. Although eDPS and tPTS were used as proof-of-concept in this study, it seems that other protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and surface structure can be applied to effective in vivo tumor detection.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/47790
ISSN
01429612
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KIST Publication > Article
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