Membrane distillation combined with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor for treating municipal wastewater

Title
Membrane distillation combined with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor for treating municipal wastewater
Authors
Hyun-Chul Kim신재원Seyeon WonJung-Yeol LeeSung Kyu Maeng송경근
Keywords
Membrane distillation; Anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor; Phosphorus removal; Effluent organic matter; Organic characterization
Issue Date
2015-03
Publisher
Water research
Citation
VOL 71, 97-106
Abstract
A fermentative strategy with an anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactor (AMBBR) was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The feasibility of using a membrane separation technique for post-treatment of anaerobic bio-effluent was evaluated with emphasis on employing a membrane distillation (MD). Three different hydrophobic 0.2 mm membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and polypropylene (PP) were examined in this study. The initial permeate flux of the membranes ranged from 2.5 to 6.3 L m 2 h 1 when treating AMBBR effluent at a temperature difference between the feed and permeate streams of 20 C, with the permeate flux increasing in the order PP < PVDF < PTFE. The permeate flux of the PTFE membrane gradually decreased to 84% of the initial flux after the 45 h run for distillation, while a flux decline in MD with either the PVDF or PP membrane was not found under the identical distillation conditions. During long-term distillation with the PVDF membrane, total phosphorus was completely rejected and >98% rejection of dissolved organic carbon was also achieved. The characterization of wastewater effluent organic matter (EfOM) using an innovative suite of analytical tools verified that almost all of the EfOM was rejected via the PVDF MD treatment.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/49284
ISSN
00431354
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KIST Publication > Article
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