Comparison of diverse estimation methods for personal exposure to air pollutants and associations with allergic symptoms: The Allergy & Gene-Environment Link (ANGEL) study

Title
Comparison of diverse estimation methods for personal exposure to air pollutants and associations with allergic symptoms: The Allergy & Gene-Environment Link (ANGEL) study
Authors
배귀남김창혁김영민김지현한영신이병재최동철정혜관전병학오인보이재영서성철노수련안강모
Keywords
air pollution; exposure assessment; atopic dermatitis; asthma; time activity; inhalation rate; panel study
Issue Date
2017-02
Publisher
The Science of the total environment
Citation
VOL 579-1136
Abstract
We estimated the exposure to ambient air pollutants and analyzed the associations with allergic diseases. We enrolled 177 children with atopic dermatitis (AD) and 70 asthmatic adults living in Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea, and followed for 17 months between August 2013 and December 2014. Parents or patients recorded symptom scores on a daily basis. Exposure to particulate matter with a diameter < 10 μm (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was estimated in four different ways in each individual, using the AQ1 (measurements from the nearest air quality monitoring station to residential houses), AQ2 (measurements modified from AQ1 with the indoor level of air pollutants and time activity of each individual), AQ1-DI, and AQ2-DI (measurements modified from AQ1 and AQ2, respectively, with daily inhalation intakes of air pollutants). A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) was used to analyze the associations between exposure metrics and clinical symptoms after adjusting for ambient temperature and humidity, age, season, gender, and time trend. The exposure metrics for PM10 and NO2 showed different distributions. Symptoms of AD and asthma were positively associated with exposure to PM10, but not NO2, in all exposure metrics. The effect size of PM10 exposure on asthma symptoms was slightly greater in metrics with inhalation capacity (AQ-DIs) than in those without (AQs). This pattern was not observed in AD. Exposure to PM10 is associated with symptom aggravation in childhood AD and adult asthma. Different exposure estimates may be used to evaluate the impact of air pollution on different allergic diseases.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/66489
ISSN
0048-9697
Appears in Collections:
KIST Publication > Article
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