Electrochemical Fragmentation of Cu2O Nanoparticles Enhancing Selective C-C Coupling from CO2 Reduction Reaction

Title
Electrochemical Fragmentation of Cu2O Nanoparticles Enhancing Selective C-C Coupling from CO2 Reduction Reaction
Authors
민병권황윤정조민경오형석원다혜정혜진이시영이찬우김청희
Issue Date
2019-03
Publisher
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Citation
VOL 141, NO 11-4633
Abstract
In this study, we demonstrate that the initial morphology of nanoparticles can be transformed into small fragmented nanoparticles, which were densely contacted to each other, during electrochemical CO2 reduction reaction (CO2RR). Cu-based nanoparticles were directly grown on a carbon support by using cysteamine immobilization agent, and the synthesized nanoparticle catalyst showed increasing activity during initial CO2RR, doubling Faradaic efficiency of C2H4 production from 27% to 57.3%. The increased C2H4 production activity was related to the morphological transformation over reaction time. Twenty nm cubic Cu2O crystalline particles gradually experienced in situ electrochemical fragmentation into 2– 4 nm small particles under the negative potential, and the fragmentation was found to be initiated from the surface of the nanocrystal. Compared to Cu@CuO nanoparticle/C or bulk Cu foil, the fragmented Cu-based NP/C catalyst achieved enhanced C2+ production selectivity, accounting 87% of the total CO2RR products, and suppressed H2 production. In-situ X-ray absorption near edge structure studies showed metallic Cu0 state was observed under CO2RR, but the fragmented nanoparticles were more readily reoxidized at open circuit potential inside of the electrolyte, allowing labile Cu states. The unique morphology, small nanoparticles stacked upon on another, is proposed to promote C– C coupling reaction selectivity from CO2RR by suppressing HER.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/69618
ISSN
0002-7863
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KIST Publication > Article
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