A highly sensitive chemical gas detecting transistor based on highly crystalline CVD-grown MoSe2 films

Title
A highly sensitive chemical gas detecting transistor based on highly crystalline CVD-grown MoSe2 films
Authors
김승민Jongyeol BaekDemin YinNa LiuInturu OmkaramChulseung JungHealin ImSeongin HongYoung Ki Hong허재현Youngki Yoon김선국
Keywords
transition metal; dichalcogenides; MoSe2; chemical sensors; chemical vapor depositon
Issue Date
2017-06
Publisher
Nano research
Citation
VOL 10, NO 6-1871
Abstract
Layered semiconductors with atomic thicknesses are becoming increasingly important as active elements in high-performance electronic devices owing to their high carrier mobilities, large surface-to-volume ratios, and rapid electrical responses to their surrounding environments. Here, we report the first implementation of a highly sensitive chemical-vapor-deposition-grown multilayer MoSe2 field-effect transistor (FET) in a NO2 gas sensor. This sensor exhibited ultra-high sensitivity (S = ca. 1,907 for NO2 at 300 ppm), real-time response, and rapid on-off switching. The high sensitivity of our MoSe2 gas sensor is attributed to changes in the gap states near the valence band induced by the NO2 gas absorbed in the MoSe2, which leads to a significant increase in hole current in the off-state regime. Device modeling and quantum transport simulations revealed that the variation of gap states with NO2 concentration is the key mechanism in a MoSe2 FET-based NO2 gas sensor. This comprehensive study, which addresses material growth, device fabrication, characterization, and device simulations, not only indicates the utility of MoSe2 FETs for high-performance chemical sensors, but also establishes a fundamental understanding of how surface chemistry influences carrier transport in layered semiconductor devices.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/69684
ISSN
1998-0124
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KIST Publication > Article
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