Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Differentiated by Exosomes Isolated from Cancer Cells Promote Cancer Cell Invasion

Title
Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Differentiated by Exosomes Isolated from Cancer Cells Promote Cancer Cell Invasion
Authors
강지윤최낙원김기민손예주이루리유혜주나도균연주헌
Issue Date
2020-10
Publisher
International journal of molecular sciences
Citation
VOL 21, NO 8153
Abstract
Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the cancer microenvironment play an essential role in metastasis. Differentiation of endothelial cells into CAFs is induced by cancer cell-derived exosomes secreted from cancer cells that transfer molecular signals to surrounding cells. Differentiated CAFs facilitate migration of cancer cells to different regions through promoting extracellular matrix (ECM) modifications. However, in vitro models in which endothelial cells exposed to cancer cell-derived exosomes secreted from various cancer cell types differentiate into CAFs or a microenvironmentally controlled model for investigating cancer cell invasion by CAFs have not yet been studied. In this study, we propose a three-dimensional in vitro cancer cell invasion model for real-time monitoring of the process of forming a cancer invasion site through CAFs induced by exosomes isolated from three types of cancer cell lines. The invasiveness of cancer cells with CAFs induced by cancer cell-derived exosomes (eCAFs) was significantly higher than that of CAFs induced by cancer cells (cCAFs) through physiological and genetic manner. In addition, different genetic tendencies of the invasion process were observed in the process of invading cancer cells according to CAFs. Our 3D microfluidic platform helps to identify specific interactions among multiple factors within the cancer microenvironment and provides a model for cancer drug development.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/72191
ISSN
1661-6596
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KIST Publication > Article
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