Microfluidic pore model study of precipitates induced by the porescale mixing of an iron sulfate solution with simulated groundwater

Title
Microfluidic pore model study of precipitates induced by the porescale mixing of an iron sulfate solution with simulated groundwater
Authors
정재식이승학테레시아박새롬Peter K. Kang
Issue Date
2021-05
Publisher
Chemosphere
Citation
VOL 271, 129857
Abstract
Precipitates induced by the pore-scale mixing of iron sulfate solutions with simulated groundwater were investigated using a microfluidic pore model to assess the environmental impacts of the infiltration of acid mine drainage into a shallow aquifer. This model was employed to visualize the formation of precipitates in a porous network and to evaluate their physicochemical influences on pore flow. Four types of groundwater (Na?HCO3, Na?SO4, Na?Cl, and Ca?Cl) were evaluated, and precipitation rates were calculated by processing images of precipitates in the pores captured via microscopy. The results showed that all groundwater types formed a yellow-brownish precipitate at the interface of the iron solution and simulated groundwater flow. Microscopic X-ray analyses demonstrated that precipitate morphology varied with groundwater type. Faster precipitation was observed in the following order by groundwater type: Na?HCO3 > Na?Cl > Na?SO4 > Ca?Cl, which was attributed to the different stability constants of the major anions in each simulated groundwater with Fe ions. Chemical equilibrium models suggested that precipitates were Fe minerals, with FeOOH as the predominant form consistent with the results of X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. The presence of FeOOH implies that precipitates may serve as an effective sorption barrier against some nutrients and heavy metals for the underlying groundwater. However, dye-flow experiments suggested that the precipitates may clog aquifer pores, thereby altering hydrogeological properties in the aquifer.
URI
http://pubs.kist.re.kr/handle/201004/72884
ISSN
0045-6535
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KIST Publication > Article
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